NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Mission Passes Critical Milestone

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Artist concept of OSIRIS-REx, the first U.S. mission to return samples from an asteroid to Earth.
Image Credit: NASA/Goddard

NASA's groundbreaking science mission to retrieve a sample from an ancient space rock has moved closer to fruition. The Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission has passed a critical milestone in its path towards launch and is officially authorized to transition into its next phase.

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Key Decision Point-D (KDP-D) occurs after the project has completed a series of independent reviews that cover the technical health, schedule and cost of the project. The milestone represents the official transition from the mission’s development stage to delivery of systems, testing and integration leading to launch. During this part of the mission’s life cycle, known as Phase D, the spacecraft bus, or the structure that will carry the science instruments, is completed, the instruments are integrated into the spacecraft and tested, and the spacecraft is shipped to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida for integration with the rocket.

“This is an exciting time for the OSIRIS-REx team,” said Dante Lauretta, principal investigator for OSIRIS-Rex at the University of Arizona, Tucson. “After almost four years of intense design efforts, we are now proceeding with the start of flight system assembly. I am grateful for the hard work and team effort required to get us to this point.”

OSIRIS-REx is the first U.S. mission to return samples from an asteroid to Earth. The spacecraft will travel to a near-Earth asteroid called Bennu and bring at least a 60-gram (2.1-ounce) sample back to Earth for study. OSIRIS-REx carries five instruments that will remotely evaluate the surface of Bennu. The mission will help scientists investigate the composition of the very early solar system and the source of organic materials and water that made their way to Earth, and improve understanding of asteroids that could impact our planet.

OSIRIS-REx is scheduled for launch in late 2016. The spacecraft will reach Bennu in 2018 and return a sample to Earth in 2023.

"The spacecraft structure has been integrated with the propellant tank and propulsion system and is ready to begin system integration in the Lockheed Martin highbay,” said Mike Donnelly, OSIRIS-REx project manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “The payload suite of cameras and sensors is well into its environmental test phase and will be delivered later this summer/fall.”

The key decision meeting was held at NASA Headquarters in Washington on March 30 and chaired by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

On March 27, assembly, launch and test operations officially began at Lockheed Martin in Denver. These operations represent a critical stage of the program when the spacecraft begins to take form, culminating with its launch. Over the next several months, technicians will install the subsystems on the main spacecraft structure, comprising avionics, power, telecomm, thermal systems, and guidance, navigation and control.

The next major milestone is the Mission Operations Review, scheduled for completion in June. The project will demonstrate that its navigation, planning, commanding, and science operations requirements are complete.

The mission's principal investigator is at the University of Arizona, Tucson. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, will provide overall mission management, systems engineering and safety and mission assurance for OSIRIS-REx. Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver will build the spacecraft. OSIRIS-REx is the third mission in NASA's New Frontiers Program. NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages New Frontiers for the agency's Science Mission Directorate.

OSIRIS-REx complements NASA's Asteroid Initiative, which aligns portions of the agency's science, space technology and human exploration capabilities in a coordinated asteroid research effort. The initiative will conduct research and analysis to better characterize and mitigate the threat these space rocks pose to our home planet.

Included in the initiative is NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM), a robotic spacecraft mission that will capture a boulder from the surface of a near-Earth asteroid and move it into a stable orbit around the moon for exploration by astronauts, all in support of advancing the nation’s journey to Mars. The agency also is engaging new industrial capabilities, partnerships, open innovation and participatory exploration through the NASA Asteroid Initiative.

NASA also has made tremendous progress in the cataloging and characterization of near Earth objects over the past five years. The president's NASA budget included, and Congress authorized, $20.4 million for an expanded NASA Near-Earth Object (NEO) Observations Program, increasing the resources for this critical program from the $4 million per year it had received since the 1990s. The program was again expanded in fiscal year 2014, with a budget of $40.5 million. NASA is asking Congress for $50 million for this important work in the 2016 budget.

NASA has identified more than 12,000 NEOs to date, including 96 percent of near-Earth asteroids larger than 0.6 miles (1 kilometer) in size. NASA has not detected any objects of this size that pose an impact hazard to Earth in the next 100 years. Smaller asteroids do pass near Earth, however, and some could pose an impact threat. In 2011, 893 near-Earth asteroids were found. In 2014, that number was increased to 1,472.

In addition to NASA's ongoing work detecting and cataloging asteroids, the agency has engaged the public in the hunt for these space rocks through the agency's Asteroid Grand Challenge activities, including prize competitions. During the recent South by Southwest Festival in Austin, Texas, the agency announced the release of a software application based on an algorithm created by a NASA challenge that has the potential to increase the number of new asteroid discoveries by amateur astronomers.

For more information about the OSIRIS-REx mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/osiris-rex

and

http://asteroidmission.org

For more information about the ARM and NASA's Asteroid Initiative, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/asteroidinitiative

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Mission Passes Critical Milestone

15-056

Artist concept of OSIRIS-REx, the first U.S. mission to return samples from an asteroid to Earth.
Image Credit: NASA/Goddard

NASA's groundbreaking science mission to retrieve a sample from an ancient space rock has moved closer to fruition. The Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission has passed a critical milestone in its path towards launch and is officially authorized to transition into its next phase.

adn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

Key Decision Point-D (KDP-D) occurs after the project has completed a series of independent reviews that cover the technical health, schedule and cost of the project. The milestone represents the official transition from the mission’s development stage to delivery of systems, testing and integration leading to launch. During this part of the mission’s life cycle, known as Phase D, the spacecraft bus, or the structure that will carry the science instruments, is completed, the instruments are integrated into the spacecraft and tested, and the spacecraft is shipped to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida for integration with the rocket.

“This is an exciting time for the OSIRIS-REx team,” said Dante Lauretta, principal investigator for OSIRIS-Rex at the University of Arizona, Tucson. “After almost four years of intense design efforts, we are now proceeding with the start of flight system assembly. I am grateful for the hard work and team effort required to get us to this point.”

OSIRIS-REx is the first U.S. mission to return samples from an asteroid to Earth. The spacecraft will travel to a near-Earth asteroid called Bennu and bring at least a 60-gram (2.1-ounce) sample back to Earth for study. OSIRIS-REx carries five instruments that will remotely evaluate the surface of Bennu. The mission will help scientists investigate the composition of the very early solar system and the source of organic materials and water that made their way to Earth, and improve understanding of asteroids that could impact our planet.

OSIRIS-REx is scheduled for launch in late 2016. The spacecraft will reach Bennu in 2018 and return a sample to Earth in 2023.

"The spacecraft structure has been integrated with the propellant tank and propulsion system and is ready to begin system integration in the Lockheed Martin highbay,” said Mike Donnelly, OSIRIS-REx project manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “The payload suite of cameras and sensors is well into its environmental test phase and will be delivered later this summer/fall.”

The key decision meeting was held at NASA Headquarters in Washington on March 30 and chaired by NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

On March 27, assembly, launch and test operations officially began at Lockheed Martin in Denver. These operations represent a critical stage of the program when the spacecraft begins to take form, culminating with its launch. Over the next several months, technicians will install the subsystems on the main spacecraft structure, comprising avionics, power, telecomm, thermal systems, and guidance, navigation and control.

The next major milestone is the Mission Operations Review, scheduled for completion in June. The project will demonstrate that its navigation, planning, commanding, and science operations requirements are complete.

The mission's principal investigator is at the University of Arizona, Tucson. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, will provide overall mission management, systems engineering and safety and mission assurance for OSIRIS-REx. Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver will build the spacecraft. OSIRIS-REx is the third mission in NASA's New Frontiers Program. NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages New Frontiers for the agency's Science Mission Directorate.

OSIRIS-REx complements NASA's Asteroid Initiative, which aligns portions of the agency's science, space technology and human exploration capabilities in a coordinated asteroid research effort. The initiative will conduct research and analysis to better characterize and mitigate the threat these space rocks pose to our home planet.

Included in the initiative is NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM), a robotic spacecraft mission that will capture a boulder from the surface of a near-Earth asteroid and move it into a stable orbit around the moon for exploration by astronauts, all in support of advancing the nation’s journey to Mars. The agency also is engaging new industrial capabilities, partnerships, open innovation and participatory exploration through the NASA Asteroid Initiative.

NASA also has made tremendous progress in the cataloging and characterization of near Earth objects over the past five years. The president's NASA budget included, and Congress authorized, $20.4 million for an expanded NASA Near-Earth Object (NEO) Observations Program, increasing the resources for this critical program from the $4 million per year it had received since the 1990s. The program was again expanded in fiscal year 2014, with a budget of $40.5 million. NASA is asking Congress for $50 million for this important work in the 2016 budget.

NASA has identified more than 12,000 NEOs to date, including 96 percent of near-Earth asteroids larger than 0.6 miles (1 kilometer) in size. NASA has not detected any objects of this size that pose an impact hazard to Earth in the next 100 years. Smaller asteroids do pass near Earth, however, and some could pose an impact threat. In 2011, 893 near-Earth asteroids were found. In 2014, that number was increased to 1,472.

In addition to NASA's ongoing work detecting and cataloging asteroids, the agency has engaged the public in the hunt for these space rocks through the agency's Asteroid Grand Challenge activities, including prize competitions. During the recent South by Southwest Festival in Austin, Texas, the agency announced the release of a software application based on an algorithm created by a NASA challenge that has the potential to increase the number of new asteroid discoveries by amateur astronomers.

For more information about the OSIRIS-REx mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/osiris-rex

and

http://asteroidmission.org

For more information about the ARM and NASA's Asteroid Initiative, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/asteroidinitiative

Sub-Committee on Ship Systems and Equipment (SSE), 2nd session, 23-27 March 2015

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March 27, 2015
SOLAS amendments on ventilation of closed vehicle, ro-ro and special category spaces finalized
Draft amendments to SOLAS regulation II-2/20 were finalized by the Sub-Committee on Ship Systems and Equipment (SSE), at its second session, for submission to the ninety-fifth session of the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 95) for adoption.

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The draft amendments had been approved by MSC 94 but referred back to the Sub-Committee for finalization, before being submitted to MSC 95 for adoption.

The draft amendments update paragraph 3.1.2.4 to clarify the application of the relaxation in that paragraph to certain spaces.

The Sub-Committee also agreed to the draft Revised design guidelines and operational recommendations for ventilation systems in ro-ro cargo spaces, which should supersede the previous version, issued in 1996 as MSC/Circ.729.

Helicopter facility fire-fighting requirements agreed
New requirements for new ships with helicopter landing facilities to be provided with foam applications systems were agreed by the Sub-Committee, for submission to MSC 95 for approval and subsequent adoption. The draft amendment to SOLAS regulation II-2/18 adds a new paragraph 2.3 to require a foam application system complying with the provisions of a new chapter 17 of the Fire Safety Systems (FSS) Code, which was also agreed by the Sub-Committee.

A similar draft amendment to the Code for the construction and equipment of mobile offshore drilling units (MODU Code) was also agreed.

The new draft chapter 17 of the FSS Code details the specifications for foam firefighting appliances for the protection of helicopter facilities, as required by SOLAS chapter II-2.

The requirements are given for helidecks and helicopter landing areas. For a helideck (defined as a purpose-built helicopter landing platform or other deck area including all structure, firefighting appliances and other equipment necessary for the safe operation of helicopters), the foam system is required to contain at least two fixed foam monitors or deck integrated foam nozzles, operating at a specified minimum discharge rate. In addition, at least two hose reels fitted with a foam-making branch pipe and non-collapsible hose sufficient to reach any part of the helideck shall be provided.

For a helicopter landing area (an area on a ship designated for occasional or emergency landing of helicopter and not designed for routine helicopter operations), at least two portable foam applicators or two hose reel foam stations are to be provided, each capable of discharging a minimum foam solution discharge rate, according to the helicopter overall length.

The Sub-Committee also agreed a draft MSC circular on Early implementation of the new chapter 17 of the FSS Code, which encourages all Parties to implement the draft new chapter 17 of the FSS Code at the earliest possible opportunity.

Related draft amendments to update the amendments to the Recommendation on Helicopter landing areas on ro-ro passenger ships (MSC/Circ.895) were also agreed, to refer to the installation of a foam application system complying with the FSS Code provisions.

Smoke management requirements agreed
The Sub-Committee finalized draft Performance standards, functional requirements and system requirements for the assessment of smoke management systems, for submission to MSC 95 for approval. The draft performance standards and requirements would apply to smoke management systems installed on new passenger ships. The systems should be designed so as to maintain sufficiently smoke free escape routes in case of fire.

Revised requirements for automatic sprinkler systems agreed
The Sub-Committee agreed draft amendments to the Revised guidelines for the maintenance and inspection of fire protection systems and appliances (to update MSC.1/Circ.1432), including a new provision for water quality testing for automatic sprinkler systems and new flow charts for the testing and replacement of sprinkler heads and water mist nozzles. The draft amendments will be forwarded to MSC 95 for approval.

A related draft amendment to chapter 8 of the FSS Code was agreed, to add a new requirement for special attention to be paid to the specification of water quality provided by the system manufacturer, to prevent internal corrosion and clogging of sprinklers.

Draft SOLAS amendment on additional fire-extinguishing arrangements in machinery spaces containing oil-fired boilers agreed
The Sub-Committee agreed draft amendments to SOLAS regulations II-2/1.2.9 and II-2/10.5.1.2.2 relating to machinery spaces of category A containing only oil-fired boilers, for submission to MSC 96 with a view to approval and subsequent adoption. The draft amendment clarifies that in the case of boilers protected by fixed local water-based firefighting systems, an approved foam-type extinguisher of at least 135 l capacity is not required.

Progress made on goal-based approach for SOLAS chapter II-2
The Sub-Committee furthered its work on developing a goal based approach to standards and in the development of a new framework of requirements for safety objectives and functional requirements for the approval of alternative design and arrangements for fire safety and life-saving appliances.

The Sub-Committee further developed draft guidelines for the selection of life safety performance criteria, which are intended to provide a methodology for the selection of performance criteria used to address the survivability of persons on board when exposed to the effects of heat, smoke, toxicity and reduced visibility. The guidelines would be intended for use to establish minimum safety margins in the available time for safe escape from spaces approved with alternative design and arrangements.

A correspondence group was established to: further develop the life safety performance criteria for alternative design and arrangements for fire safety, taking into account the required level of safety for SOLAS chapter II-2 compliant prescriptive designs; consider the method for evaluating the Available Safe Egress Time (ASET), and choose an appropriate type of method to determine this time limit (e.g. using a proposed smoke layer height approach or a different method such as the time required to maintain tenability within the affected space); define the life safety performance criteria against which the ASET will be measured; and submit a report to SSE 3.

Progress made on measures for onboard lifting appliances and winches
The Sub-Committee unanimously agreed that more robust guidelines for the safety of onboard lifting appliances and winches should be developed and, referring to the decision of MSC 89 that the Committee's approval should be sought before undertaking any technical work, invited MSC 95 to endorse the Sub-Committee's decision and decide on whether mandatory SOLAS requirements should be prepared in addition to the development of guidelines. The Sub-Committee also requested MSC 95 to consider the re-establishment of the Correspondence Group for Onboard Lifting Appliances and Winches, to progress the work intersessionally, with a view to reporting to SSE 3.

Maintenance and testing of lifeboats discussed
The Sub-Committee further discussed a proposed package of mandatory measures intended to address servicing and maintenance of lifeboats and rescue boats, launching appliances and release gear, in order to minimize the number of accidents involving lifeboats and rescue boats.

The Sub-Committee agreed the title of a draft MSC resolution should be Requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of lifeboats and rescue boats, launching appliances and release gear. Discussions centred on the role of the authorized service provider and certified personnel. The Sub-Committee was unable to reach agreement on the proposal to allow "certified personnel" to carry out annual examinations and five-year operational tests. In this connection, the Sub-Committee agreed to request MSC 95 to give clear instructions on the issue.

Unified interpretations agreed
The Sub-Committee agreed unified interpretations, for submission to MSC 96 for approval, related to:

• application of materials other than steel on engine, turbine and gearbox installations in SOLAS regulation II-2/4;

• arrangements for fixed hydrocarbon gas detection systems in double-hull and double-bottom spaces of oil tankers, as detailed in SOLAS regulation II-2/4.5.7.3.1;

• non-combustible material as "steel or equivalent" for ventilation ducts, as detailed in SOLAS regulation II-2/9.7.1.1;

• application of provisions in SOLAS and the LSA Code relating to the general emergency alarms and public address systems (SOLAS regulations III/6.4 and III/6.5 and section 7.2 of the LSA Code);

• implementation of the requirements relating to lifeboat release and retrieval systems (paragraph 4.4.7.6 of the LSA Code, as amended by resolution MSC.320(89));

• chapter 5 of the FSS Code, regarding the number of setting points to the discharge control for the fire extinguishing medium;

• chapter 6 of the FSS Code, relating to foam-generating capacity of fixed foam fire-extinguishing systems; and

• chapter 9 of the FSS Code, relating to the additional indicating unit of fixed fire detection and fire alarm systems in cargo control rooms.

Six candidates for position of IMO Secretary-General

IMO-London2

By the established deadline of 31 March 2015, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) has received the nominations of six candidates, nominated by their Governments for the position of Secretary-General of IMO.

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The election for the post will be held at the 114th session of the 40-Member strong IMO Council, which meets from 29 June to 3 July 2015. The decision of the Council will be submitted to the IMO Assembly, which meets for its 29th session from 23 November to 2 December 2015, for its approval.

 

The nominations received are listed below in alphabetical order by candidates’ surname.

 

Candidate Government

Mr. Andreas Chrysostomou Republic of Cyprus

Mr. Vitaly Klyuev Russian Federation

Mr. Ki-tack Lim Republic of Korea

Dr. Maximo Q. Mejia Jr. Republic of the Philippines

Mr. Andreas Nordseth Kingdom of Denmark

Mr. Juvenal Shiundu Republic of Kenya

 

The present incumbent, Mr. Koji Sekimizu, ends his four-year term as Secretary-General on 31 December 2015.

Six candidates for position of IMO Secretary-General

IMO-London2

By the established deadline of 31 March 2015, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) has received the nominations of six candidates, nominated by their Governments for the position of Secretary-General of IMO.

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The election for the post will be held at the 114th session of the 40-Member strong IMO Council, which meets from 29 June to 3 July 2015. The decision of the Council will be submitted to the IMO Assembly, which meets for its 29th session from 23 November to 2 December 2015, for its approval.

 

The nominations received are listed below in alphabetical order by candidates’ surname.

 

Candidate Government

Mr. Andreas Chrysostomou Republic of Cyprus

Mr. Vitaly Klyuev Russian Federation

Mr. Ki-tack Lim Republic of Korea

Dr. Maximo Q. Mejia Jr. Republic of the Philippines

Mr. Andreas Nordseth Kingdom of Denmark

Mr. Juvenal Shiundu Republic of Kenya

 

The present incumbent, Mr. Koji Sekimizu, ends his four-year term as Secretary-General on 31 December 2015.

Gladding-Hearn starts construction of Circle Line newbuilds; Strategic delivers advanced wind farm crew transfer cat

GladdingHearn-85c4e5caef1a4cf7e0d6c330285e5da1 L

Gladding-Hearn starts construction of Circle Line newbuilds
March 31, 2015—Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding, Duclos Corporation, recently began construction of the first of three new sightseeing vessels for New York City's Circle Line Sightseeing Yachts, Inc. Delivery of the first new vessel is scheduled for 2016. The new 600-passenger all-steel vessels will measure 165 feet in length, with a 34-foot beam and a 22.6-foot air-draft, enabling them to pass under the low bridges on the Harlem River.

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Industry News
Strategic delivers advanced wind farm crew transfer cat
The vessel is the first of four 26 m StratCat design crew vessels on order at Triyards subsidiary Strategic Marine that promises to deliver new levels of operational capability and comfort.

Ingalls launches John Finn (DDG 113)
John Finn is the 63rd Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) class destroyer, and the first of the DDG 51 Flight IIA restart ships.

IMO panel learns more about Viking's LifeCraft concept
Self-propelled, with four battery-powered electrical motors, one at each corner, each survival craft unit is fully equipped as a lifeboat, with a fire retardant canopy and a simple steering system that offers a high degree of maneuverability.
Stena Germanica back in service, burning methanol
Following a conversion in the Remontowa shipyard, Poland, Stena Line's Stena Germanica is now back in service between Kiel, Germany, and Gothenburg, Sweden, as the world's first methanol fueled ferry.

Curiosity Sniffs Out History of Martian Atmosphere

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A Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) team member at NASA Goddard prepares the SAM testbed for an experiment. This test copy of the SAM suite of instruments is inside a chamber that, when closed, can model the pressure and temperature environment that SAM sees inside Curiosity on Mars.
Image Credit: NASA

NASA's Curiosity rover is using a new experiment to better understand the history of the Martian atmosphere by analyzing xenon.

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While NASA's Curiosity rover concluded its detailed examination of the rock layers of the "Pahrump Hills" in Gale Crater on Mars this winter, some members of the rover team were busy analyzing the Martian atmosphere for xenon, a heavy noble gas.

Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment analyzed xenon in the planet’s atmosphere. Since noble gases are chemically inert and do not react with other substances in the air or on the ground, they are excellent tracers of the history of the atmosphere. Xenon is present in the Martian atmosphere at a challengingly low quantity and can be directly measured only with on-site experiments such as SAM.

"Xenon is a fundamental measurement to make on a planet such as Mars or Venus, since it provides essential information to understand the early history of these planets and why they turned out so differently from Earth,” said Melissa Trainer, one of the scientists analyzing the SAM data.

A planetary atmosphere is made up of different gases, which are in turn made up of variants of the same chemical element called isotopes. When a planet loses its atmosphere, that process can affect the ratios of remaining isotopes.

Measuring xenon tells us more about the history of the loss of the Martian atmosphere. The special characteristics of xenon – it exists naturally in nine different isotopes, ranging in atomic mass from 124 (with 70 neutrons per atom) to 136 (with 82 neutrons per atom) – allows us to learn more about the process by which the layers of atmosphere were stripped off of Mars than using measurements of other gases.

A process removing gas from the top of the atmosphere removes lighter isotopes more readily than heavier ones leaving a ratio higher in heavier isotopes than it was originally.

The SAM measurement of the ratios of the nine xenon isotopes traces a very early period in the history of Mars when a vigorous atmospheric escape process was pulling away even the heavy xenon gas. The lighter isotopes were escaping just a bit faster than the heavy isotopes.

Those escapes affected the ratio of isotopes in the atmosphere left behind, and the ratios today are a signature retained in the atmosphere for billions of years. This signature was first inferred several decades ago from isotope measurements on small amounts of Martian atmospheric gas trapped in rocks from Mars that made their way to Earth as meteorites.

"We are seeing a remarkably close match of the in-situ data to that from bits of atmosphere captured in some of the Martian meteorites," said SAM Deputy Principal Investigator Pan Conrad.

SAM previously measured the ratio of two isotopes of a different noble gas, argon. The results pointed to continuous loss over time of much of the original atmosphere of Mars.

The xenon experiment required months of careful testing at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, using a close copy of the SAM instrument enclosed in a chamber that simulates the Mars environment. This testing was led by Goddard's Charles Malespin, who developed and optimized the sequence of instructions for SAM to carry out on Mars.

"I'm gratified that we were able to successfully execute this run on Mars and demonstrate this new capability for Curiosity," said Malespin.

NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project is using Curiosity to determine if life was possible on Mars and study major changes in Martian environmental conditions. NASA studies Mars to learn more about our own planet, and in preparation for future human missions to Mars. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, a division of Caltech, manages the project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about SAM, visit:

http://ssed.gsfc.nasa.gov/sam/

SAM experiment data are archived in the Planetary Data System, online at:

http://pds.nasa.gov/

For more information about Curiosity, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl

You can follow the mission on Facebook and Twitter at:

http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity

and

http://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity

Boeing, Air India celebrate 20th 787 Dreamliner

787-AIN-787 K66318-02-low

New airplane is world's first 787 in Star Alliance livery

NORTH CHARLESTON, S.C., March 31, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Boeing (NYSE: BA) and Air India celebrated the airline's milestone delivery of its 20th 787 Dreamliner from Boeing's final assembly facility in North Charleston, S.C.

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"Taking delivery of our 20th 787 Dreamliner marks an important day for Air India," said Rohit Nandan, Chairman and Managing Director, Air India. "With this airplane we are building on the success of our other 787s, which are providing an exceptional experience to our passengers while allowing us to expand our network both within India and around the world."

The new Dreamliner also features the Star Alliance livery, Air India's – and the world's – first 787 to do so. The flag carrier joined the leading global airline network last year, reflecting the strong network growth of the Indian aviation market.

"Today Air India joins an elite group airlines who have taken delivery of 20 or more 787s and this milestone highlights the successful partnership we have between Boeing and Air India," said Dinesh Keskar, senior vice president, Asia Pacific and India Sales, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. "The 787 continues to provide great value to Air India, opening new routes, with superior fuel efficiency and unmatched passenger comfort."

Air India serves more than 60 domestic and 37 international destinations. The airline has ordered 27 787 Dreamliners, with seven more scheduled to be delivered.

AW169 Flight Training Device Ready for Training

AW1259 AW169 FTD

All new training device now operational in Italy

Designed and built by AgustaWestland and operated by Rotorsim
Key milestone in the provision of AW169 training services ahead of aircraft deliveries

Finmeccanica-AgustaWestland announced today the availability of a new AW169 Flight Training Device (FTD) at its A. Marchetti Training Academy in Sesto Calende, Italy. The device has been certified by a joint European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA ) and Italian Civil Aviation Authority (ENAC) team to FTD Level 2 as per CS-FSTD(H), the certification specification for Helicopter Flight Simulation Training Devices.

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The AW169 FTD has been designed and built by AgustaWestland and is operated by Rotorsim, a joint venture between CAE and AgustaWestland. The FTD offers the functionality of a Full Flight Simulator without motion, and is being introduced by Rotorsim to support AgustaWestland in delivering flight training to AW169 customers. Currently orders for nearly 150 new generation AW169 intermediate twin-engine helicopters have been placed by customers around the world for a range of applications including corporate transport, air ambulance and law enforcement.

The AW169 FTD is the first training device to be certified following the EASA Operational Suitability Data (OSD) process and represents a key milestone of the AW169 programme, in preparation for the entry-into-service of the new type in a few months’ time.

The AW169 FTD features an AgustaWestland developed flight dynamic model, avionics and aircraft software modelling, and a high performance visual system with 150 degree by 60 degree field-of-view 12 ft (3.66 m) dome display system. The FTD will provide effective training for pilots in the use of automated flight data systems and various flight procedures including situational awareness and decision making under normal, abnormal and emergency conditions. This device will allow for credits for IFR Training and for the majority of malfunctions and emergency scenarios.

The AW169 FTD has been installed in the new simulation building at the A. Marchetti Training Academy in Sesto Calende which will eventually house up to nine Full Flight Simulators (FFSs) and five FTDs (Flight Training Devices), further expanding the Training Academy’s capabilities.

This milestone further confirms AgustaWestland’s capabilities in providing a complete range of training services to its existing and future customers, ranging from designing to manufacturing and putting into service complex training systems.

Training systems supplied by AgustaWestland are uniquely able to track the product configuration from the point of delivery through life, offering a complete and integrated operational environment, linking logistic and training management systems with flight and mission planning systems to share critical data in support of operational efficiency and effectiveness.

Global Cyber Security Market To Be Worth $75.4BN In 2015, According to a New Study on ASDReports

cyberwarfare

Amsterdam, March 31, 2015 --[ASDWire]-- The report, now available on ASDReports, Cyber Security Market 2015-2025: Leading Companies in Network, Data, Endpoint, Application & Cloud Security, Identity Management & Security Operations report indicates that the cyber security market is set to be worth $75.4bn in 2015, as high-demand continues for information security solutions.

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The report commented that: ‘“The cyber security market is currently undergoing unprecedented growth and development thanks to a wide variety of internal and external factors. Almost every month a major cyber event occurs which forces security into the news, encouraging governments to pass new legislation and expand their defences and capabilities. Although for the most part limited to the disruption of web services or the theft of data, enough has happened for many leaders to consider cyber issues a national concern, relevant enough to feature into all future strategic military and security planning. This is driving growth in the most demanding cyber security sectors, and providing large defence contractors with more reason to acquire smaller firms that have been operating for many years, particularly in the area of critical infrastructure protection. Complementing this is a massive amount of private-sector interest in effective security, in addition to purchases made by worried consumers. The financial industry especially is one vertical which has not been slow to seek outside expertise, and with more and more individuals purchasing smart-devices and using cloud services, the demand for protections is only likely to increase.”

The 590 page report contains 492 tables, charts and graphs that utilise visual representation in order to clarify trends and market projections within the cyber security market. The report provides a range of forecasts for the period 2015-2025, as well as for 7 submarket sectors Network Security Data Security, Endpoint Security, Application Security, Cloud Security, Security Operations and Identity Management. The 7 submarket forecasts are revealed at the global level, regional level and also for each of the 21 leading national markets, providing unprecedented detail.

In addition, the 21 leading national cyber security systems markets are analysed by this report over the period 2015-2025 (as well as an analysis of the 'Rest of the World' market which are all subdivided into the 7 submarket forecasts. The report also provides profiles of 14 leading companies operating within the market, includes 7 exclusive expert interviews with leading companies DataSoft Corporation, Bayshore Networks, Inc., CA Technologies, Inc., Sentar, Inc., N-Dimension Solutions, Inc., Corero Network Security, Inc. and Intego, Inc.